Programs

  • Her parents came to the US as displaced persons following the Second World War, and she was raised in a family that cherished the Hungarian heritage, spoke Hungarian at home, and held the Hungarian culture in highest regard. Starting life in a very poor neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio, she learned to navigate the educational system, and realized the lessons and challenges to overcome to succeed in the American workplace
    Guest speaker: Klara K. Papp, PhD, Educational Psychologist and Graber Term Professor of Health Learning, Director of Student Assessment and Program Evaluation at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio

    Some of the major differences between the U.S. and Hungarian cultures is that in the U.S. we may be less hierarchical and less deferential to authority.   In the US, we believe in the power of positive tension, of constructive conflict that generates sustainable growth and new ways of thinking about and solving problems and working together.  We speak up when we disagree with each other, even if it means publicly confronting our superiors.  It is a culture that supports and appreciates individual perspectives and the worth of each individual’s contributions.  Teamwork, in this context, really means bringing different perspectives to the table and being willing to confront each other, respectfully, if we disagree.  It takes self-confidence and situational awareness to identify and value different perspectives to appreciate opposing views.  The appreciation for diversity is reflected in the educational system that puts students into working groups to learn new material, apply what they learn to unfamiliar problems, and work in teams to accomplish learning goals. People recognize the value of dynamic discord, of being 'out of one's comfort zone', of appreciating different perspectives, and of valuing each member’s contributions.

     Klara K. Papp, PhD is an Educational Psychologist and Graber Term Professor of Health Learning, Director of Student Assessment and Program Evaluation at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio.  She is a member of the educational leadership in the School of Medicine and works with faculty to construct valid measures of student assessment and program evaluation.  On a national level, Klara served as chair of the educational research committee for Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine.  She held the position of deputy editor for the Journal of General Internal Medicine, as an accreditation reviewer for California schools and colleges, and has been a member of the National Institutes of Health study section for grants in health and science education. 

    Admission is FREE! | The language of the program is English.

    We are looking forward to meeting you at American Corner Debrecen.